Sunday, 15 April 2012

She was alright when she left us...

I can't really blog even a bit about Greater Spotted Ulster and not mention what happened at 11.40pm last night one hundred years ago. We have been zealously changing the channel at the mere mention of it for the last week. This is not because we do not care. Nor is it even the same black Belfast humour that coined the title phrase.

I do hope to go for a stroll past yardmen soon, and to see Titanic Belfast (though probably not the staircase). It's our huge urban myth that your grandfather built the Titanic. Apparently mine did. I grew up thinking that because my dad worked for a short while as a short youth in the shipyard he must have built it too. Despite the fact that he wasn't born until 1940.

I'm not good on books/films/anything that disturbs. I don't mind having my conventionality disturbed, or my complacency, or my worldview, or even to be honest my sleep pattern. I just don't cope well with the use of tragedy, pain, abuse, horror for any reason, literary or otherwise.

Yesterday's Belfast Telegraph listed the 1512 names and gave ages. Most in their 20s or 30s. I hear ghosts in the cold. It makes me cross.

7 comments:

Gabe said...

Oh Mags I have always felt the same way. To dwell on and make superficial something that lead to that many deaths. I wish more people heard the voices, also!!

Pom Pom said...

I know. I don't like stuff that disturbs either. I wake up all night thinking and thinking.
When my students talk about The Titanic film being re-released, they say, "I can't sit in a theater for that long." I love sixth graders. Eighth graders were CRAZY about the story and obsessed with reading about it. I must say, that I am, too. We don't get all the hoopla here, but it does tug at hearts.

Buttercup said...

I saw the movie when it was first released and it still makes me sad to think about it. It wouldn't have been my choice, but a friend talked me into it. She was seeing it for the third time. A hundred years later and still brings tears to our eyes.

Betty said...

Although I have watched some of the story on TV, I find it so sad, I don't want to see people distressed, lost, facing death. These disturbed souls should be able to rest in peace. It seems to be human nature to linger on these things but really there is nothing new to add, it's been done to death and needs to become a legend and put to rest. However, I understand the fascination it holds for some.

Scarlet said...

I share your sentiments. I have never seen the film, I haven't watched the series which has just been on TV.I just don't want to watch the dramatisation of the tragic end of so many people's lives.

Floss said...

It looks like we all came over here because your post called us - I feel the same and never wanted to see the film - am I afraid or am I simply sensitive to the idea of making entertainment out of tragedy? Strangely, I adore the black humour of your title! I respct the way that we (that's we Brits, I suppose) make humour out of the most serious happenings - it's not the same as trivialising them.

Isabelle said...

Me too - haven't seen the film. I like nice cheery art forms these days...